How deep should a fence post be set to secure a fence?

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Whether you’re building a fence, setting a mailbox or even a basketball goal, the best way to ensure your posts will stay sturdy and true for years is to set them in concrete and make sure the depth is sufficient enough to withstand the elements.

The depth that a post should be buried has been debated for years. Our recommendation is that the post depth should be approximately 1/3 of the fence height.  In most cases this means a depth of at least 2 to 3 feet. There are multiple factors that should be considered when making this decision. The height of a fence and the weight of a fence are the key components when deciding how deep a fence post should be buried. Also, the soil the post are set in is a major factor to consider. A fence that tends to lean shortly after being installed is normally a result of not being deep enough in the ground, or a large enough footing,  or unforeseen  and uncontrollable soil issues. This is a must to withstand high winds we experience regularly in North Texas.

Contact the experts at Titan if you are considering a new fence and rely on our expertise to provide you with a quality fence that will last for years.

HOA Fence Guidelines

titan-fence-feature-vinyl_f_improf_300x212Home Owner Associations are here to stay and do serve a purpose in keeping our neighborhoods attractive and property values high. However, they all have guidelines that must be followed before you make any major changes to your residence.  Before you rush out to install the fence of your dreams, make sure you check with your Homeowners Association.

Typically, a HOA can take anywhere from one week to six weeks to approve your fence project. Generally speaking, you have to get the HOA’s approval whenever you do anything to the exterior of your residence. This can even include painting and landscaping.

Many HOA ordinances and rules prevent you from constructing chain link, split rail, or wire containment fences because they are not aesthetically appealing. If you install a fence without HOA approval, you can almost be sure you will have to tear it down or face serious fines.

Horizontal Fences

horizontal-fence-panelThe nontraditional horizontal fence offers a look far from that of a side by side fence.  This style fence is perfect for more modern and contemporary looking homes.  The modern look it has seems to provide an atmosphere of being indoors while enjoying an outdoor environment.

 

horizontal-fence-dallasThe restaurant industry uses horizontal fences often since it tends to provide more privacy than a traditional side by side or board on board fence as well as an elegant atmosphere.  When deciding on a fence design that will best fit your needs our sales professionals are here for you and eager to answer all of your questions.

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Contact Us Today: 940-365-9999
info@titanfence.com

 

Your Authority (and partner) in Top Quality Fencing

Titan fence is strategically located off of Hwy. 380 between McKinney and Denton. Our facility allows us to meet the fencing needs of Dallas and Ft. Worth along with almost all of the surrounding cities.

Here is a quick tour of our facility.

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Ever wish you had a taller fence?

Split_Rail-4Ranch Style Fences – We sell many of these and they can be a big project.  The state of Texas and the term “Ranch” go hand in hand.  What is the real definition of a ranch?  Patrick Murfee, the administrator of the Ranching Heritage Association in Lubbock, actually laughed out loud when we asked for one when being interviewed by Texas Monthly Magazine.  After talking to him and other experts in the field, they settled on four criteria that a Texas ranch must meet.

1. On the land in question, livestock—cattle, goats, horses, and the like—must be raised for profit.

2. The land can be noncontiguous but must be managed as one ranch—an important point, since many ranches, including the King Ranch, are made up of several chunks of land, some of which are hundreds of miles apart but are overseen by the same person or group.

3. The land must be in Texas. (Nearly 50 percent of the ranch owners on our list have acreage in other states or countries.)

4. The land must be primarily owner-operated; that is, owned and run by the same people, or at least members of the same family. Leased land doesn’t count. That’s why the venerable Kenedy Ranches aren’t on the list.

IN TEXAS IN 1998 THE RECIPE FOR FAME AND FORTUNE CALLS FOR NERDS, not herds. But you couldn’t get the owners of the state’s twenty largest ranches to trade their hundreds of thousands of acres—not even for millions of dollars in Dell Computer stock.

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